Art

Lunar Garden

"After spending many years traveling to Japan I became fascinated with the dry gardens in Kyoto, specifically the way in which the gardens are permanent yet completely ephemeral and remade every day,” said Daniel Arsham, an american artist who studied at the Cooper Union in New York. His new solo exhibition is on view at Visionaire in New York until the 5th of November.

The work, titled “Lunar Garden,” is a combination of architecture, sound, and an immersive environment that reinterprets the traditional Japanese rock garden: surreal and dreamlike, Arsham’s oasis uses a vibrant pink color scheme, features a moon-like orb spanning 3 meters, and peculiar patterns in the sand that the artist freshly rakes every day. Traditional greenery, such as the bonsai, has been replaced by a petrified tree and a lantern. For Arsham, the use of color is a new experiment. Previously, he has relied on a palette of black, white and gray tones. The reason for this shift is that Arsham is colorblind, but has recently been able to see vibrant colors thanks to special glasses: the radical change is his sense of sight and perception of color has prompted an important new visual language for the artist which can be witnessed for the first time in “Lunar Garden.”


Art

Fendi pays homage to Rome with Giuseppe Penone's Foglie di Pietra

Following Giuseppe Penone’s Matrice exhibition hosted at Fendi’s headquarters in Rome’s Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, Fendi installs a new site specific artwork by the artist entitled Foglie di Pietra in Largo Goldoni. Thus, FENDI renews and highlights its undying bond with Rome by gifting the city and its people important artwork from one of the most celebrated contemporary sculptors.

Foglie di Petra (Leaves of Stone, 2016) is one of Penone’s most complex artworks: two tall bronze trees standing at 18 and 9 metres respectively, interlace their branches five metres above an 11-tonne sculpted marble rock. Archaeology and ruins, history and biology are intertwined with one another bringing attention to the permanent bond between nature and culture. A celebration of a deep synthesis between the flowing of natural and human time through a longing and romantic nostalgia for lost civilisations.

Through virtuous use of precious materials such as bronze and marble, Penone’s Foglie di Petra recalls the illusionism and marvel of Roman Baroque, while the fragments and the ruins inserted in the sculpture’s branches harken back to the Classic and Medieval era. What’s more, the artwork is the first oeuvre of a contemporary artist to be permanently installed in Rome’s public spaces and is bound to become a symbol of the identity of an ever-changing city that remains steadfastly linked to its historical roots.

www.fendi.com

Art

The world through Henk Schiffmacher’s “camereyes”

When Texas, Henk Schffmacher's daughter discovered her father's old 35mm negatives in a dusty drawer, she knew they had to be exposed for the world to see.

Dutch tattoo artist, Henk Schiffmacher has become known for his energetic and observational photographic work that is now being collected and exhibited for the first time ever. Highlighting the best and worst facets of modern society, this eclectic ensemble of pictures is a real representation of the world we live in through Schiffmacher's camera.

Taken between 1970 and 1985 these pictures give us a raw insight into the world of youths, bikers and tattoo fetishists from all around the globe – from Las Vegas, L.A., Amsterdam, and Tokyo to Mumbai, Manila, San Francisco and Kuala Lumpur.

This makes for an interesting juxtaposition: a wild mix of cultures, nationalities and excess against the backdrop of vintage cityscapes and timeless scenarios. Schiffmacher's photography offers a unique and brilliant view of the world as it was four decades ago.

Pure, direct and unprecedented just like photography should be.

www.schiffmachershoots.com

Art

Michaël Borremans Dances at Zeno X

Michael Borremans has launched his sixth solo exhibition at Zeno X, a Mecca of contemporary painting in the heart of Antwerp, Belgium. Sixteen Dances, the title of the show, is primarily a reference to the changing and multi-faceted nature of painting, and how the medium has the ability to forever adapt to the contemporary zeitgeist.


The paintings are structured into three series: this is a typical way of working for Borremans, who has a necessity to always dig deeper and discover new meaning through multiple variations of the same theme. The paintings function almost as vignettes, which give the exhibition a cinematic feel: a clear continuum is interrupted by random stills which confuse any possible narrative structure. This gives an ambiguous and dark atmosphere, encapsulating the morbid and grotesque scenes present in the paintings, such as babies dancing covered in blood and figures in straight jackets. Borremans undoubtedly takes references from Bosch, Bruegel and Goya in this series of works, which questions the morality of human nature and exploits its subconscious savagery and cannibalism. While absorbing these haunted tableaux, viewers are left feeling dread and disorientation: a feeling that permeates in our current age and society.


The exhibition will run until October 14th 2017.

Art

The Beats and The Vanities, Larry Fink Exhibition at Armani/SIlos

A collection of exquisite black and white photographs from Larry Fink’s The Beats and The Vanities books will comprise the latest exhibition at Armani/Silos. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity for the legendary photographer’s work and idiosyncratic vision to be experienced as one as they have never before been shown together before.

Giorgio Armani himself is a great fan of Larry Fink’s work, finding his ability to capture form and line in such a fluid way something he can relate to as well as a designer. “Fink is a jazz fan, and you can almost view these images in terms of musical composition – people in flow, surprising us, possessing an unconscious sensuality”, he adds.

Born in Brooklyn and raised in a progressive and politically active family, Fink cut his teeth as a photographer as part of the late beat generation, when he hooked up with a group of beats at the age of 17. Political activism, protests and marches formed the photographers worldview who documented the times through his medium-format camera.

His pictures serve as a time capsule and a candid look into his world, perfectly capturing the sense of romance and rebellion that characterised the underground jazz-fuelled youth movement of the time. A regular editorial contributor for prestigious titles such as The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, it was the latter that recognised his ability to bring them something different if let loose to create.

His visual record of the famous and their surrounding courtiers is not concerned with who’s who – rather it focuses on what’s happening. As Fink himself describes it, he tries to embrace the souls of all people, regardless of their conditions.

The Beats and The Vanities, Photographs by Larry Fink will be on show at the Armani/Silos until the end of July 2017.

www.armanisilos.com

Art

Museo del Novecento and Fondazione Furla present Simone Forti: To Play the Flute

Museo del Novecento and Fondazione Furla present Simone Forti: To Play the Flute – a selection of performances by this Italian-born American artist, choreographer and dancer that will fill the Museo del Novecento’s Sala Fontana with sound and movement for three days.

This marks the first event of the Furla Series #01 – Time after Time, Space after Space, a performance- centred program that will feature five events from five different artists with varying backgrounds, influences and approaches to this form of expression.

Simone Forti, has been a leading figure in postmodern dance for over fifty years and has helped shaped the landscape of contemporary dance with performances that range from minimalist movement to improvisations that also featured spoken word. To Play the Flute is a reenactment of four seminal performance moments in Forti’s career that highlights her approach to the interplay of actions and objects, and they key role assigned to sound.


Forti’s famous Dance Constructions – now part of New York’s MoMa permanent collection – served as the foundation of her solid reputation in the 60’s art world thanks to her innovative ways of experimenting with the language of movement. The performances rethink the relationship between body and object, movement and sculpture, rules and improvisation and are based on everyday movements or interactions with objects. Personal expression and improvisation always appear to be hampered by the effort required to carry out a given physical task or follow certain rules.

The first Time after Time, Space after Space event will take place on the 21st to the 23rd of September in the Sala Fontana of Milan’s Novecento Museum. The program for Time after Time, Space after Space will include four more events featuring artists from around the world, at bimonthly intervals: Alexandra Bachzetsis (November 2017), Adelita Husni-Bey (January 2018), Paulina Olowska (March 2018) and Christian Marclay (April 2018)

www.museodelnovecento.org

www.fondazionefurla.org

Art

Iris Schomaker – Come to the Edge

Berlin based artist Iris Schomaker, will display her first Benelux exhibition “Come to the Edge” at the Reflex Gallery in Amsterdam showing off her expressive large-scale watercolor and oil-works on paper featuring figures in various states of repose.

The show will consist purely of new works representing an arresting close-up of a single figure, lying reading, resting, sitting curled up, unaware of the viewer’s gaze because “it’s more like a sudden glimpse-something unexpected. These figures do not offer contact. Their faces are blank, vanishing.” As the artist herself said.

Is exactly this blankness that took Iris to project on to the image looking at the very anonymity of those faces as an invitation to the viewers to bring something of their own being surrounded by powerfully immersive and contemplative figures. Moreover the figures in the newer works from the German artist are often accompanied by a symbolic animal that is more idea, atmosphere, and energy, more a sprit guide that brings a strange, irritating and inspiring energy rather than a flesh and bones companion.

In muted shades of black and grey, with only the thinnest veil of oil wash in faded aquamarine or yellow, the overall impression of the palette is decidedly monochrome. The figures are resolutely not portraits; the final creation is given by a work of research through images of unknown people like photos, sketches, ripped pages of magazines, combined with her drawing and creativity, in order to give birth to an incredible mix between classic paintings and current graphic novels.

The exhibition will run until April 26th 2017

www.irisschomaker.de

Art

POWERMASK: Walter van Beirendonk at the Wereldmuseum

From the 1st of September 2017 until the 7th of January 2018, the ethnographic Wereldmuseum in Rotterdam will host POWERMASK, an exhibition curated by Antwerp fashion designer Walter van Beirendonck. The exhibition is a journey through the deeply symbolic, totemic and patrimonial world of masks, an often underrated accessory in contemporary fashion. Van Beirendonck has incorporated masks into his fashion collections since the 1990s, sourcing inspiration from André Breton, Pablo Picasso and Pieter Bruegel’s caricatural portraits.

The exhibition will examine links between Western art and African masks, the supernatural rituals surrounding masks, masks in fashion, masks as fetishes, and numerous other aspects. Van Beirendonck has styled the 125 masks, unpacked from the Wereldmuseum’s archive, with colorful costumes and fashion silhouettes. The backdrop of the exhibition is a delightful patchwork of wall installations by contemporary artists such as Brian Kenny, Coco Fronsac and Charles Fréger, macabre paintings of James Ensor, playful illustrations by Keith Haring, and designs by haute couture heavyweights Viktor & Rolf and Jean Paul Gaultier.

www.wereldmuseum.nl

Art

Bottega Veneta and SCoP: when fashion supports art

Tomas Maier, Bottega Veneta’s creative director, has never hid his passion for art, making it a proper flagship of the Venetian brand’s attitude. Bottega Veneta showed for the first time its strong commitment to art and culture in 2001, when Maier introduced the “Art of Collaboration”: an ongoing project which invites photographers and visual artists in order to reflect brand’s aesthetic inside its campaigns.

This year the brand confirms its ever-lasting addiction to art, partnering with the Shanghai Centre of Photography in order to support four key international exhibitions hold at the most prestigious photography institute in China. SCoP is indeed considered worldwide the city’s very first place entirely dedicated to photography showcasing its best and diverse genres.

“Made in Germany: German photography from the 19th century to today” will be the first exhibition supported by Bottega Veneta. The projects will comprises an unparalleled selection of iconic masterpieces that together with contemporary examples will give an up-to-date and fresh touch to the entire exhibition.

The exhibition will run until April 2nd 2017
www.bottegaveneta.com